Environmental Health Risks from Abandoned Mines in the Sierra Nevada (2011)

NEWLY UPDATED! — This document contains summaries of four studies conducted by The Sierra Fund to learn about the environmental health exposure potential associated with abandoned mines in the Sierra Nevada, and a pilot health outreach program to bring these findings to Sierra communities.

An informative evening in Quincy with The Sierra Fund

TSF Quincy Public Meeting

Last Thursday over sixty people showed up to the Plumas County Fairgrounds for an informational event about legacy mines in the Sierra Nevada hosted by a regional nonprofit organization, The Sierra Fund (TSF). The event was presented with the support of the County of Plumas and the California Indian Environmental Alliance.

“We were thrilled to have such a broad range of participants attend the meeting,” said Elizabeth Martin, CEO of The Sierra Fund. “The number of people who attended and the great questions they asked clearly show that folks are interested in our region’s mining history and how it plays into our lives today.”

Like It or Not: Mercury in Gold Country Fish (Editorial)

In response to several skewed opinion articles published in regional news outlets, The Sierra Fund has compiled this fully referenced piece: “Like it or Not, Mercury in Gold Country Fish.”

Gold Country Angler Survey (2011)

The Sierra Fund’s Gold Country Angler Survey was a study that interviewed anglers at local fishing locations, to learn whether they were being exposed to mercury by eating the fish they catch.

Results of the Gold Country Angler Survey indicated that approximately half of anglers at Sierra water bodies plan to eat what they catch that day, and nearly all report eating locally caught fish sometime in the last year.