TSF Releases New Technical Report on Malakoff Diggins and the Humbug Creek Watershed

Today, The Sierra Fund is releasing a new report, the result of more than five years of collaborative science-based data collection, research, and analysis at Malakoff Diggins State Historic Park, part of the California State Parks system. The newly released Report outlines an assessment of the various physical and chemical characteristics of this legacy hydraulic mining park, including the pit or “diggins”; tunnels and shafts from the old mining operation; and the discharge from these features into downstream watersheds. The assessment portion of this Report used a variety of methods to learn about the nature of the pit itself as well as the Humbug Creek (into which the “diggins” discharge) including:

Humbug Creek Watershed Assessment and Management Recommendations Report (2015)

This 216-page report and 8-page executive summary are the result of the first phase of The Sierra Fund’s Malakoff Diggins Project, more than five years of collaborative science-based data collection, research, and analysis at Malakoff Diggins State Historic Park (MDSHP), part of the California State Parks system.

Sierra Fish Consumption Advisory (Poster)

This fish consumption advisory information applies to all lakes and reservoirs in California without site-specific advice, which is the vast majority of lakes in the Sierra.

The Sierra Fund worked with agency staff at the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment and Department of Public Health to develop this advisory poster for Sierra anglers, which consists of the state-issued fish consumption advisory for these lakes and reservoirs.

California Court threatens to reopen rivers to destructive suction dredge mining

Damaging practice would harm waterways, wildlife, cultural resources The following press release was published by The Sierra Fund’s partners at the Center for Biological Diversity SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.— A coalition fighting highly destructive suction dredge mining is considering further legal options after a state judge ruled that a California law banning the practice is preempted […]

Support TSF’s Fish Tissue Sampling Program

The Sierra Fund’s science team is venturing into the world of fishing in the name of public health. But in order to expand our impact by analyzing more fish tissue samples, we need YOU to help. We are working to raise $7,500 over the next month to cover the costs of having the fish tissue analyzed at an EPA-certified lab in order to be used as official public health information. We will begin fishing this fall at Rollins Reservoir and with your help continue our efforts at other water bodies. Our goal is to raise enough money to catch and analyze 250 more fish for mercury. There are two ways you can help, and both take under a minute

TSF supports Proposition 1: Water Bond

At their board meeting on Tuesday, September 9, 2014 the Board of Directors of The Sierra Fund voted unanimously to support the water bond that has been placed by the Legislature and the Governor onto the November 2014 ballot. “The Board took this position because we understand the urgent need for the State to invest in water quality and watershed restoration projects around the state. The water quality situation in some disadvantaged communities has reached a crisis and we must act,” noted Board Chair Tim Seward.

Water Bond (Proposition #1) contains The Sierra Fund’s language to remediate mines, and more

Earlier this month the state legislature passed a water bond, and the Governor signed this new version replacing the old water bond that had been first placed on the ballot in the fall of 2009. The Secretary of State has assigned the bond item the Number 1 for placement on the November 4, 2014 election ballot. Despite the intensity of the advocacy around the bill, The Sierra Fund was successful in catching the attention of decision makers about the very crucial issue of mercury contamination in the state that originates in upstream, legacy mines.

Fish, Mercury and You (Brochure)

This brochure covers precautionary measures to take when choosing which locally-caught fish to eat. The brochure was created as a follow up to The Sierra Fund’s two studies on human exposure to legacy mining toxins. High levels of mercury are common in certain species of fish in the Sierra Nevada. Mercury is known to cause serious health problems, especially for developing children and babies.

Environmental Health Risks from Abandoned Mines in the Sierra Nevada (2011)

NEWLY UPDATED! — This document contains summaries of four studies conducted by The Sierra Fund to learn about the environmental health exposure potential associated with abandoned mines in the Sierra Nevada, and a pilot health outreach program to bring these findings to Sierra communities.

TSF Releases Report on Pilot Environmental Health Outreach Program

The Sierra Fund is proud to release a new report detailing activities, results, and lessons learned from a year-long pilot outreach program in four Sierra communities. The short term goals of this program were to prevent and reduce exposure to mercury from locally caught fish in Sierra communities, and to raise awareness about mercury in the fish and other mine-related toxins, among community members, leaders, and healthcare providers. The long term goal is to build a movement to clean up sources of legacy mining pollution in the Sierra.

Environmental Health Outreach Program Report (2014)

This ten-page report outlines goals, activities, and lessons learned from The Sierra Fund’s 1-year pilot outreach program about environmental health threats associated with abandoned mines. Goals of the program were to prevent and reduce exposure to mercury from locally caught fish in Sierra communities; to raise awareness about mercury in the fish and other mine-related […]

The Sierra Fund’s Mercury Health Summit a Success

Last week, The Sierra Fund hosted a free public event, “Mercury and Human Health: An informational summit on the impacts of mercury exposure through fish consumption” in the California State Capitol Building.  Attendees included medical doctors, public health experts, policymakers and others.  The keynote speaker for the event was Dr. Jane Hightower, a San Francisco […]