An informative evening in Quincy with The Sierra Fund

TSF Quincy Public Meeting

Last Thursday over sixty people showed up to the Plumas County Fairgrounds for an informational event about legacy mines in the Sierra Nevada hosted by a regional nonprofit organization, The Sierra Fund (TSF). The event was presented with the support of the County of Plumas and the California Indian Environmental Alliance.

“We were thrilled to have such a broad range of participants attend the meeting,” said Elizabeth Martin, CEO of The Sierra Fund. “The number of people who attended and the great questions they asked clearly show that folks are interested in our region’s mining history and how it plays into our lives today.”

Gold Country Recreational Trails and Abandoned Mines Assessment (2011)

The physical dangers to recreationists at abandoned mine sites are well known, but the hazards associated with exposure to heavy metals in dust at abandoned mine sites are not well understood. This pilot study identified contaminants of concern (COC) at popular recreation areas around Downieville, Nevada City, and Foresthill, CA.

Abandoned Mines, Dust and You (Brochure)

This brochure covers precautionary measures to take when recreating around legacy mine sites, where there is potential heavy metals in dust. The brochure was created as a follow up to The Sierra Fund’s two studies on human exposure to legacy mining toxins.